LGBT - HBTQ-demonstration i Hanoi, Vietnam

March for LGBT rights in Hanoi, Vietnam. Sweden works on many levels to advance the human rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans- and Intersexual persons. The support includes capacity development of LGBTI-organisations, legal aid and protection measures as well as social and health initiatives. 

Photo: Institute for Studies of Society, Economy and Environment / iSEE

HUMAN RIGHTS BASED APPROACH AT SIDA

Rights of LGBTI persons

Updated: 9 September 2015

Sida has developed briefs with information and guidance on the application of the Human Rights Based Approach in relation to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex persons. There are briefs for almost every country and/or region where Sweden is engaged in development cooperation. You can access the briefs below.

The human rights of LGBTI persons are a Swedish priority. Briefs have been prepared to provide basic information about the situation of this group and inspire discussions on what Sweden could do to better include LGBTI rights in programmes and dialogue.

Regional and country specific briefs on LGBTI rights:

Sub-Saharan Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa
Burkina Faso
Ethiopia
Democratic Republic of Congo
Kenya
Liberia
Mali
Mozambique
Rwanda
Somalia
Sudan and South Sudan
Tanzania
Uganda
Zambia
Zimbabwe


Middle East and North Africa

Middle East and North Africa
Palestine


South East Asia

South East Asia
Afghanistan
Bangladesh
Cambodia
Myanmar


Western Balkan

Western Balkans


Eastern Europe

Eastern Europe
Russia


Latin America

Colombia
Guatemala


The human rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) persons

LGBTI persons are unable to live openly, free from discrimination and fear in many countries where Sweden is engaged in development cooperation. Their situation is affected by criminalising laws, hostile public attitudes and harassments from people of power in governments, parliaments and religious groups.

In recent years, LGBTI movements have become more visible and vocal in most countries, leading to backlashes in some countries. Positive trends are also noted, where some countries have decriminalised homosexuality and taken steps towards more tolerant societies. The UN Human Rights Commission has established that the principle of non-discrimination, which is part of all human rights conventions, also covers LGBTI persons (although some countries voted against this). The UN Secretary General has specifically spoken in support of LGBTI rights.


Page owner: Communication Unit

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